Passenger rail to be restored first amid German floods

Image: ANP/dpa Picture-Alliance. Bernd Weissbrod

Floods have engulfed southern Germany during the past week. Rail infrastructure has not been spared by the water. It has caused major disruptions to rail transportation in the region. DB InfraGO says that the priority is now on fixing passenger rail.

As floods in southern Germany are causing major disruptions on the rail network, DB InfraGO is focusing on restoring passenger rail first and foremost. The German infrastructure manager points out that traffic is “gradually stabilising”, but that the situation remains tense. In Bavaria, rail may still face restrictions, DB InfraGO says.

The infrastructure manager declined to comment on the extent of the damages, nor did it comment on the effects of the floods on the upcoming large-scale rail renovations in Germany.

As DB InfraGO focuses on passenger rail, DB Cargo says it is doing its “utmost to maintain supply chains”. Chairwoman of the board of management of DB Cargo, Sigrid Evelyn Nikutta, says that “the floods have a major impact on rail traffic and, of course, on freight traffic and thus on supply chains. Many railway lines were washed under or over and closed by the masses of water. Where we can’t get through, we have to continue to take other routes with a lot of effort, if possible. As DB Cargo, we are doing our utmost to maintain supply chains!”

Image: LinkedIn/Sigrid Evelyn Nikutta.

Effects on rail freight

Rail freight companies are broadly affected by the floods and the ensuing restrictions. According to rail freight organisation Die Güterbahnen, the effects “extend across the segments”, such as block trains and combined transport.

In particular, the route to and from Munich has been problematic for the sector. Most trains had to be rerouted via Passau, into Austria and back towards Munich. Other trains southward went via Switzerland into Italy. Other difficult routes, as reported by freight operators, include Augsburg – Donauwörth, Munich – Ingolstadt and Nuremberg – Würzburg. Die Güterbahnen says that failure rates reached up to 70 per cent on these routes.

Heavy rainfall

Over the weekend of 1 and 2 June, heavy flooding affected southern Germany after persistent heavy rainfall. The extreme weather caused rivers to overflow, and the floods have persisted throughout the week. At least six people have passed away as a result of the floods.

While the rain has now subsided, the high water levels are only gradually improving. It remains unclear how long rail infrastructure will be affected.

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Passenger rail to be restored first amid German floods | RailFreight.com

Passenger rail to be restored first amid German floods

Image: ANP/dpa Picture-Alliance. Bernd Weissbrod

Floods have engulfed southern Germany during the past week. Rail infrastructure has not been spared by the water. It has caused major disruptions to rail transportation in the region. DB InfraGO says that the priority is now on fixing passenger rail.

As floods in southern Germany are causing major disruptions on the rail network, DB InfraGO is focusing on restoring passenger rail first and foremost. The German infrastructure manager points out that traffic is “gradually stabilising”, but that the situation remains tense. In Bavaria, rail may still face restrictions, DB InfraGO says.

The infrastructure manager declined to comment on the extent of the damages, nor did it comment on the effects of the floods on the upcoming large-scale rail renovations in Germany.

As DB InfraGO focuses on passenger rail, DB Cargo says it is doing its “utmost to maintain supply chains”. Chairwoman of the board of management of DB Cargo, Sigrid Evelyn Nikutta, says that “the floods have a major impact on rail traffic and, of course, on freight traffic and thus on supply chains. Many railway lines were washed under or over and closed by the masses of water. Where we can’t get through, we have to continue to take other routes with a lot of effort, if possible. As DB Cargo, we are doing our utmost to maintain supply chains!”

Image: LinkedIn/Sigrid Evelyn Nikutta.

Effects on rail freight

Rail freight companies are broadly affected by the floods and the ensuing restrictions. According to rail freight organisation Die Güterbahnen, the effects “extend across the segments”, such as block trains and combined transport.

In particular, the route to and from Munich has been problematic for the sector. Most trains had to be rerouted via Passau, into Austria and back towards Munich. Other trains southward went via Switzerland into Italy. Other difficult routes, as reported by freight operators, include Augsburg – Donauwörth, Munich – Ingolstadt and Nuremberg – Würzburg. Die Güterbahnen says that failure rates reached up to 70 per cent on these routes.

Heavy rainfall

Over the weekend of 1 and 2 June, heavy flooding affected southern Germany after persistent heavy rainfall. The extreme weather caused rivers to overflow, and the floods have persisted throughout the week. At least six people have passed away as a result of the floods.

While the rain has now subsided, the high water levels are only gradually improving. It remains unclear how long rail infrastructure will be affected.

Also read:

You just read one of our premium articles free of charge

Want full access? Take advantage of our exclusive offer

See the offer

Author: Dennis van der Laan

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