Germany steps in to help railway companies pay electricity bill

Image: Denny Müller, Unsplash Denny Müller

The German parliament has voted in favour of reducing electricity prices for railways to 13 cents per kWh. This is a significant reduction of what the industry pays now, according to Conor Feighan from the European Rail Freight Association (ERFA).

The support measure still needs to be approved by the European Commission, but if it is implemented, it will apply for up to 90 per cent of historical or forecast demand. “This will give certainty to railway companies in negotiating prices with their customers. Now they can plan for the future”, the industry advocate said during a recently held webinar from RailFreight.com.

Like many sectors of the European economy, the railway sector has been hit extremely hard by increasing electricity costs arising out of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. In some cases, the cost of electricity has increased by up to 1000 per cent. ERFA has played an important role over the past year in raising the need for support on electricity prices.

Hopefully domino effect

The step taken by the German government will hopefully create a domino effect in the EU, Feighan continued. “The approach by the member states varies from doing very little, to making the situation worse, by supporting diesel prices. There are also countries that have provided some level of support, such as Spain, which kept the prices of electricity at the 2021 level.”

The reason for the difference in approach is money, he explains. “The gap needs to be filled by the member states, and not each member state is equally able to do this. Some are also more exposed to the effects of the war, or less reliant on supply of energy sources from Russia.

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Author: Majorie van Leijen

Majorie van Leijen is the editor-in-chief of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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Germany steps in to help railway companies pay electricity bill | RailFreight.com

Germany steps in to help railway companies pay electricity bill

Image: Denny Müller, Unsplash Denny Müller

The German parliament has voted in favour of reducing electricity prices for railways to 13 cents per kWh. This is a significant reduction of what the industry pays now, according to Conor Feighan from the European Rail Freight Association (ERFA).

The support measure still needs to be approved by the European Commission, but if it is implemented, it will apply for up to 90 per cent of historical or forecast demand. “This will give certainty to railway companies in negotiating prices with their customers. Now they can plan for the future”, the industry advocate said during a recently held webinar from RailFreight.com.

Like many sectors of the European economy, the railway sector has been hit extremely hard by increasing electricity costs arising out of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. In some cases, the cost of electricity has increased by up to 1000 per cent. ERFA has played an important role over the past year in raising the need for support on electricity prices.

Hopefully domino effect

The step taken by the German government will hopefully create a domino effect in the EU, Feighan continued. “The approach by the member states varies from doing very little, to making the situation worse, by supporting diesel prices. There are also countries that have provided some level of support, such as Spain, which kept the prices of electricity at the 2021 level.”

The reason for the difference in approach is money, he explains. “The gap needs to be filled by the member states, and not each member state is equally able to do this. Some are also more exposed to the effects of the war, or less reliant on supply of energy sources from Russia.

Watch the interview

You just read one of our premium articles free of charge

Want full access? Take advantage of our exclusive offer

See the offer

Author: Majorie van Leijen

Majorie van Leijen is the editor-in-chief of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

Add your comment

characters remaining.

Log in through one of the following social media partners to comment.