Duisburg. Photo credit: Rolf Köppen

Duisport and Port of Hamburg here to stay on the Silk Road

Duisburg. Photo credit: Rolf Köppen

Germany and the Silk Road have a long-standing tradition. It started when the first Eurasian train departed Chongqing in Southeast China on 19 March 2011, with its final destination being Duisburg in Germany. The corridor might have undergone multiple shifts since then; however, German hubs like Duisport and the port of Hamburg claim they are here to stay and work closer together.

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Author: Nikos Papatolios

Nikos Papatolios is the Editorial Coordinator of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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Duisport and Port of Hamburg here to stay on the Silk Road | RailFreight.com
Duisburg. Photo credit: Rolf Köppen

Duisport and Port of Hamburg here to stay on the Silk Road

Duisburg. Photo credit: Rolf Köppen

Germany and the Silk Road have a long-standing tradition. It started when the first Eurasian train departed Chongqing in Southeast China on 19 March 2011, with its final destination being Duisburg in Germany. The corridor might have undergone multiple shifts since then; however, German hubs like Duisport and the port of Hamburg claim they are here to stay and work closer together.

Do you want to read the full article?

Are you already a member?

Log in

Having problems logging in? Call +31(0)10 280 1000 or send an email to customerdesk@promedia.nl.

 

Author: Nikos Papatolios

Nikos Papatolios is the Chief Editor of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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