German port-rail project kicks off with first container train

Port of Dortmund. Image: Shutterstock. Tupungato

The German project known as LOG4NRW, aiming to improve rail connectivity and efficiency in the Ruhr area, has kicked off with the first container train service. The train left Kreuztal and transited to Duisburg via Dortmund, while cargo was transloaded on barge and reached Rotterdam. The link is part of an inland transport-rail synergy seeing German ports and railway companies cooperating closer. The Ruhr-South Westphalia trains will run twice a week.

“Especially in our congested North Rhine-Westphalia, with unfortunately increasing infrastructure problems, we see the future of logistics in an intelligent linking of modes of transport. Our cooperation creates resilience through practical modal shift and has an immensely sustainable effect by reducing the emissions burden of transport,” commented DeltaPort Managing Director Andreas Stolte.

According to Kreisbahn Siegen-Wittgenstein (KSW), the project’s railway operator, the first signs for the project were positive since the train left Kreuztal with a 90 per cent occupancy, signalling that there will possibly be enough demand in place to keep the service running in the future.

Quick implementation

For the record, the LOG4NRW project was conceived and presented as an idea last summer when duisport, the port of Dortmund, DeltaPorts and private rail operator KSW unveiled their plans to tackle the heavy congestion characterising the German railway network. The project’s objective was and remains to provide a seamless and efficient rail system between terminals in Duisburg, Dortmund, Voerde-Emmelsum and Kreuztal.

“The fact that we can get started just two months after the first discussions with potential customers shows that we had the right idea at the right time. Not least, with a view to the increase in toll fees in December, the railway is once again proving to be an excellent alternative and a real problem solver,” said duisport CEO Markus Bangen.

Additionally, it should be noted that the project is under the patronage of Oliver Krischer, Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Transport of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Voerde-Emmelsum still out

The terminal in Voerde-Emmelsum was included in the initial plans; however, it was not mentioned in the first service roll-out. That is because the DeltaPorts terminal is still stranded from rail services. Floods occurring in mid-June resulted in the damage and subsequent dismantling of a railway bridge in Dinslaken, around fifty kilometres away from Emmelsum.

However, the bridge in Dinslaken was the only rail gateway that the Voerde-Emmelsum could use to connect with the main railway network. With the bridge still out of order, and with no clear timeframe for its complete restoration, the terminal is currently not using rail but direct barge services to connect with Duisburg.

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Author: Nikos Papatolios

Nikos Papatolios is the Chief Editor of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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German port-rail project kicks off with first container train | RailFreight.com

German port-rail project kicks off with first container train

Port of Dortmund. Image: Shutterstock. Tupungato

The German project known as LOG4NRW, aiming to improve rail connectivity and efficiency in the Ruhr area, has kicked off with the first container train service. The train left Kreuztal and transited to Duisburg via Dortmund, while cargo was transloaded on barge and reached Rotterdam. The link is part of an inland transport-rail synergy seeing German ports and railway companies cooperating closer. The Ruhr-South Westphalia trains will run twice a week.

“Especially in our congested North Rhine-Westphalia, with unfortunately increasing infrastructure problems, we see the future of logistics in an intelligent linking of modes of transport. Our cooperation creates resilience through practical modal shift and has an immensely sustainable effect by reducing the emissions burden of transport,” commented DeltaPort Managing Director Andreas Stolte.

According to Kreisbahn Siegen-Wittgenstein (KSW), the project’s railway operator, the first signs for the project were positive since the train left Kreuztal with a 90 per cent occupancy, signalling that there will possibly be enough demand in place to keep the service running in the future.

Quick implementation

For the record, the LOG4NRW project was conceived and presented as an idea last summer when duisport, the port of Dortmund, DeltaPorts and private rail operator KSW unveiled their plans to tackle the heavy congestion characterising the German railway network. The project’s objective was and remains to provide a seamless and efficient rail system between terminals in Duisburg, Dortmund, Voerde-Emmelsum and Kreuztal.

“The fact that we can get started just two months after the first discussions with potential customers shows that we had the right idea at the right time. Not least, with a view to the increase in toll fees in December, the railway is once again proving to be an excellent alternative and a real problem solver,” said duisport CEO Markus Bangen.

Additionally, it should be noted that the project is under the patronage of Oliver Krischer, Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Transport of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Voerde-Emmelsum still out

The terminal in Voerde-Emmelsum was included in the initial plans; however, it was not mentioned in the first service roll-out. That is because the DeltaPorts terminal is still stranded from rail services. Floods occurring in mid-June resulted in the damage and subsequent dismantling of a railway bridge in Dinslaken, around fifty kilometres away from Emmelsum.

However, the bridge in Dinslaken was the only rail gateway that the Voerde-Emmelsum could use to connect with the main railway network. With the bridge still out of order, and with no clear timeframe for its complete restoration, the terminal is currently not using rail but direct barge services to connect with Duisburg.

You just read one of our premium articles free of charge

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Author: Nikos Papatolios

Nikos Papatolios is the Chief Editor of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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