Lyon-Turin: works have started on another section of the French tunnel

Image: TELT

Drilling operations on the French side of the base tunnel for the Lyon-Turin railway have started on Thursday 8 December for the tunnel connecting Saint Jean de Maurienne and Saint Julien Montdenis. The 3-kilometre-long tunnel will be added to the 10,5 km already built in April between Saint Martin la Porte and La Praz, less than 15 kilometers from the border with Italy.

This new section will be the access point to the border-crossing tunnel that will run from Saint Jean de Maurienne to Bussoleno, crossing the Mont d’Ambin. The tunnel will stretch over 57 kilometres and will offer an alternative route to the Frejus tunnel, which connects Bardonecchia, in Italy, with Modane, in France through the Mont Vinaigre.

Construction of the base tunnel on the Italian side is expected to start in 2023. The whole line should be operative by 2032, according to Emmanuel Humbert, Deputy Director of Constructions at Tunnel Euralpin Lyon Turin (TELT). TELT is the company in charge of designing, building, and managing the tunnel. It is co-owned by the French State, via the Ministry for the Ecological Transition, and the Italian state, via Ferrovie dello Stato, Italy’s state-owned railway holding company.

The Lyon-Turin railway

The idea of a new railway line between Lyon and Turin was brought forward by SNCF in 1990, while the actual design and project were drafted in 2001. Since 2005, this project has been included in the TEN-T project launched by the EU, as part of the Mediterranean Corridor. Freight trains will be able to run at 120 km/h, which is not considered to be high speed in the EU since 2008 when the minimum was raised to 160 km/h. The same goes for passenger trains, for which the maximum speed allowed on the track will be 220 km/h, while the EU minimum was raised to 250km/h 14 years ago.

Image: TELT

The whole line will be 235 kilometres long and the project was divided into three sections. The line between Lyon and Saint Jean de Maurienne will be funded by the French government and managed by SNCF. The railway connecting Bussoleno with Turin will be funded by the Italian government and managed by RFI. The third section is the tunnel mentioned above that crosses the two countries. For this project, TELT is taking care of the construction and part of the funding comes from the European Union.

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Author: Marco Raimondi

Marco Raimondi is an editor of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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Lyon-Turin: works have started on another section of the French tunnel | RailFreight.com

Lyon-Turin: works have started on another section of the French tunnel

Image: TELT

Drilling operations on the French side of the base tunnel for the Lyon-Turin railway have started on Thursday 8 December for the tunnel connecting Saint Jean de Maurienne and Saint Julien Montdenis. The 3-kilometre-long tunnel will be added to the 10,5 km already built in April between Saint Martin la Porte and La Praz, less than 15 kilometers from the border with Italy.

This new section will be the access point to the border-crossing tunnel that will run from Saint Jean de Maurienne to Bussoleno, crossing the Mont d’Ambin. The tunnel will stretch over 57 kilometres and will offer an alternative route to the Frejus tunnel, which connects Bardonecchia, in Italy, with Modane, in France through the Mont Vinaigre.

Construction of the base tunnel on the Italian side is expected to start in 2023. The whole line should be operative by 2032, according to Emmanuel Humbert, Deputy Director of Constructions at Tunnel Euralpin Lyon Turin (TELT). TELT is the company in charge of designing, building, and managing the tunnel. It is co-owned by the French State, via the Ministry for the Ecological Transition, and the Italian state, via Ferrovie dello Stato, Italy’s state-owned railway holding company.

The Lyon-Turin railway

The idea of a new railway line between Lyon and Turin was brought forward by SNCF in 1990, while the actual design and project were drafted in 2001. Since 2005, this project has been included in the TEN-T project launched by the EU, as part of the Mediterranean Corridor. Freight trains will be able to run at 120 km/h, which is not considered to be high speed in the EU since 2008 when the minimum was raised to 160 km/h. The same goes for passenger trains, for which the maximum speed allowed on the track will be 220 km/h, while the EU minimum was raised to 250km/h 14 years ago.

Image: TELT

The whole line will be 235 kilometres long and the project was divided into three sections. The line between Lyon and Saint Jean de Maurienne will be funded by the French government and managed by SNCF. The railway connecting Bussoleno with Turin will be funded by the Italian government and managed by RFI. The third section is the tunnel mentioned above that crosses the two countries. For this project, TELT is taking care of the construction and part of the funding comes from the European Union.

Also read:

You just read one of our premium articles free of charge

Want full access? Take advantage of our exclusive offer

See the offer

Author: Marco Raimondi

Marco Raimondi is an editor of RailFreight.com, the online magazine for rail freight professionals.

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